Clear the Windows Paging File at Shutdown

First off, why is this important?   The paging file is a cache of information that is offloaded from your system when it needs to move stuff around.  This can be both programs and data.  The important part here is that it can be data.  Normally you don’t need to worry about this and as you turn off and on your computer it automatically handles all of this information.   The paging file has been tweaked and modified over the years and functions very efficiently with all the Windows defaults.   The one problem that it can cause is for people who deal with sensitive information.  While the defaults work great it still retains information when you shut down your computer.   So if your information requires you to do things like clearing cache and history then you are missing something if you do not also clear the paging file.

This fix will help with security but, as with anything like this, the drawback is that it slows down the shutdown process.  This is due to the fact that it needs to perform the clearing of the paging file before it shuts down.

If you want the quick fix you can go to Microsofts Fix It.  Or, if you are a do it yourselfer, here is the registry edit:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\

ClearPageFileAtShutdown = 1

If the ClearPageFileAtShutdown does not exist create it using DWORD 32Bit).

If you want to set it not to clear the paging file, then you can just change the value to 0.

Flash Player

Most people don’t know it but Adobe does have some settings you can change for Flash.  If you like to tinker with settings you can do so here.  There are some security settings that may be useful in keeping tracking or malware away.   Basically you can set rights to sites globally and also white-list some sites that you like (and trust).

It is done through a web page at: Flash Player Control Panel

The setting pages looks like a graphic but it actually works. As always be careful when changing any settings.

Windows Keyboard Shortcuts

CTRL+C (Copy)
CTRL+X (Cut)
CTRL+V (Paste)
CTRL+Z (Undo)
Delete (Delete)
Shift+Delete (Delete the selected item permanently without placing the item in the Recycle Bin)
CTRL while dragging an item (Copy the selected item)
CTRL+Shift while dragging an item (Create a shortcut to the selected item)
F2 key (Rename the selected item)
CTRL+RIGHT ARROW (Move the insertion point to the beginning of the next word)
CTRL+LEFT ARROW (Move the insertion point to the beginning of the previous word)
CTRL+DOWN ARROW (Move the insertion point to the beginning of the next paragraph)
CTRL+UP ARROW (Move the insertion point to the beginning of the previous paragraph)
CTRL+Shift with any of the arrow keys (Highlight a block of text)
Shift with any of the arrow keys (Select more than one item in a window or on the desktop, or select text in a document)
CTRL+A (Select all)
F3 key (Search for a file or a folder)
Alt+Enter (View the properties for the selected item)
Alt+F4 (Close the active item, or quit the active program)
Alt+Enter (Display the properties of the selected object)
Alt+Spacebar (Open the shortcut menu for the active window)
CTRL+F4 (Close the active document in programs that enable you to have multiple documents open simultaneously)
Alt+Tab (Switch between the open items)
Alt+ESC (Cycle through items in the order that they had been opened)
F6 key (Cycle through the screen elements in a window or on the desktop)
F4 key (Display the Address bar list in My Computer or Windows Explorer)
Shift+F10 (Display the shortcut menu for the selected item)
Alt+Spacebar (Display the System menu for the active window)
CTRL+ESC (Display the Start menu)
Alt+Underlined letter in a menu name (Display the corresponding menu)
Underlined letter in a command name on an open menu (Perform the corresponding command)
F10 key (Activate the menu bar in the active program)
RIGHT ARROW (Open the next menu to the right, or open a submenu)
LEFT ARROW (Open the next menu to the left, or close a submenu)
F5 key (Update the active window)
Backspace (View the folder one level up in My Computer or Windows Explorer)
ESC (Cancel the current task)
Shift when you insert a CD-ROM into the CD-ROM drive (Prevent the CD-ROM from automatically playing)

Windows 10 default printer

Windows 10 comes with some features that try to enhance our windows experience. One of these features is one to automatically select the last printer that you printed to as your new default printer. For a lot of people this feature will be very helpful. However for those who like the old way of the same printer always being default it can be burdensome.

For the first group… enjoy the new feature.

For the second group… there is an easy fix. Open settings and then Devices. You will already be at Printers & Scanners at that point all you need to do is scroll down to the bottom where you will see “Let Windows manage my default printer” Just turn that off then scroll back up and click on the printer you want as default then select it “Set as default”.

Annoying Windows 10 upgrade notifications?

Windows 7 and 8 are getting hit harder and harder with upgrade notifications for Windows 10. But what if you don’t want to move to Windows 10?

There are a bunch of different ways to remove that annoying Windows 10 upgrade notification but none of them are convenient or user friendly and most of them require you to reboot your computer. Well the folks at Ultimate Outsider have created a cool utility that will disable those notices without having to reboot and can even prevent future notices from popping up. Just use their GWX control panel and eliminate all of the annoying Windows 10 pop ups.